burgundian

Gothic architecture

The Gothic style mainly manifested in the architecture of temples, cathedrals, churches, monasteries. Developed on the basis of romance. more specifically Burgundian architecture. Unlike the Romanesque style with its round arches, massive walls and small Windows, typical of Gothic arches with a pointed top, a narrow and high towers and columns, the richly decorated facade with carved details (winery. the tympanums. the archivolt ), and multi-color stained glass Lancet Windows. All the style elements that emphasize the vertical.

In Gothic architecture distinguish 3 stages of development: early, Mature (high Gothic), and late.

The Church of the monastery of Saint-Denis, designed by Abbot Suger. considered the first Gothic architectural structure. In its construction were removed many pillars and interior walls, and the Church has become more graceful look compared to Romanesque “fortress of God”. As a sample, in most cases, took the chapel Send-Chapelle in Paris.

From Ile-de-France (France) Gothic architectural style spread in Western, Central and southern Europe to Germany. England, etc. In Italy he reigned long, and, as a “barbaric style” quickly gave way to the Renaissance ; and since he came here from Germany, it is still called “stile tedesco” — German style.

With the arrival in the early sixteenth century Renaissance North and West of the Continue reading

The mysterious pyramids of Mauritius
The mysterious pyramids of Mauritius The pyramids -- mysterious constructions. They excite the minds not only of ordinary people and the seekers of the mysterious, but scientists. And if the…

Continue reading →

Templars and Gothic
World history – the knights Templar and the Gothic... Very nice post, revealing the story of a few Templars from a different perspective. About the real history of the Templars…

Continue reading →

Ancient structures
How to see the most mysterious ancient structures. Back to list of articles "There are always things to ... what did not dream our wise men!". Do you agree that…

Continue reading →