subculture

The main elements of the Gothic style in architecture

Features of the Gothic style in architecture

The Romanesque architecture of feudalism was the development of the higher life demands of society. It is the awareness of Europeans of knightly virtues, and the need for more luxurious surroundings that has become the basis of the Gothic style in art, was finally adopted in the XIII century.

This mysterious and somewhat gloomy style was a logical conclusion to art of the middle ages, widely spread in Western Europe, and only partially referring to its Eastern outskirts. Temples and cathedrals were a major architectural embodiment of Gothic. These buildings belongs the Milan Cathedral, whose construction was started in 1386.

The unprecedented height of the Gothic churches was achieved using timber frame construction system. And extensive interiors were decorated with huge Windows, stunning multicolored skillfully made stained-glass Windows.

The main elements of Gothic architecture are:

arches – ribs;

the flying buttresses – open semi arch;

the pillars that serve as pillars for Lancet arches.

Other design features include the vertical projections of the buttresses, cross vaults, carved pediments – winery, pointed openwork towers – pinnacles, Lancet Windows and portals. The facades were decorated with complex Continue reading

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